The double-mobility acetabular component in revision total hip replacement

The United Kingdom experience

N. L. Vasukutty, R. G. Middleton, E. C. Matthews, P. S. Young, C. E. Uzoigwe, T. H. A. Minhas

Abstract

We present our experience with a double-mobility acetabular component in 155 consecutive revision total hip replacements in 149 patients undertaken between 2005 and 2009, with particular emphasis on the incidence of further dislocation. The mean age of the patients was 77 years (42 to 89) with 59 males and 90 females. In all, five patients died and seven were lost to follow-up. Indications for revision were aseptic loosening in 113 hips, recurrent instability in 29, peri-prosthetic fracture in 11 and sepsis in two. The mean follow-up was 42 months (18 to 68). Three hips (2%) in three patients dislocated within six weeks of surgery; one of these dislocated again after one year. All three were managed successfully with closed reduction. Two of the three dislocations occurred in patients who had undergone revision for recurrent dislocation. All three were found at revision to have abductor deficiency. There were no dislocations in those revised for either aseptic loosening or sepsis.

These results demonstrate a good mid-term outcome for this component. In the 29 patients revised for instability, only two had a further dislocation, both of which were managed by closed reduction.

Footnotes

  • The authors are grateful to S. Petty-Saphon, PhD (Spine-issimus Ltd) for helping with the study by providing technical specifications of the implant and previous study reports, and Sister M. Howes, Arthroplasty Nurse Practitioner, and J. Newell, Orthopaedic Secretary, for their help with this study. No benefits in any form have been received or will be received from a commercial party related directly or indirectly to the subject of this article.

    No benefits in any form have been received or will be received from a commercial party related directly or indirectly to the subject of this article.

  • Received June 30, 2011.
  • Accepted January 5, 2012.
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