Total hip replacement and hemiarthroplasty in mobile, independent patients with a displaced intracapsular fracture of the femoral neck

A SEVEN- TO TEN-YEAR FOLLOW-UP REPORT OF A PROSPECTIVE RANDOMISED CONTROLLED TRIAL

P. P. Avery, R. P. Baker, M. J. Walton, J. C. Rooker, B. Squires, M. F. Gargan, G. C. Bannister

Abstract

We reviewed the seven- to ten-year results of our previously reported prospective randomised controlled trial comparing total hip replacement and hemiarthroplasty for the treatment of displaced intracapsular fracture of the femoral neck. Of our original study group of 81 patients, 47 were still alive.

After a mean follow up of nine years (7 to 10) overall mortality was 32.5% and 51.2% after total hip replacement and hemiarthroplasty, respectively (p = 0.09). At 100 months postoperatively a significantly greater proportion of hemiarthroplasty patients had died (p = 0.026). Three hips dislocated following total hip replacement and none after hemiarthroplasty. In both the total hip replacement and hemiarthroplasty groups a deterioration had occurred in walking distance (p = 0.02 and p < 0.001, respectively). One total hip replacement required revision compared with four hemiarthroplasties which were revised to total hip replacements. All surviving patients with a total hip replacement demonstrated wear of the cemented polyethylene component and all hemiarthroplasties had produced acetabular erosion.

There was lower mortality (p = 0.013) and a trend towards superior function in patients with a total hip replacement in the medium term.

  • Received March 15, 2011.
  • Accepted April 11, 2011.
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